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What ignites the right time for courageous authenticity to succeed?

copy-of-stephanie-pope-2019Stephanie Pope

Director | Te Wana Quality Standards and Accreditation Programme

After the Australian elections last weekend, this blog has become very different to the one that I had started to write.

I had been writing about the challenges for the community and social sector organisations we work with trying to stretch human and other resources in order to meet their many compliance burdens, and how this activity is actually compromising their quality improvement process. Read more »

Welfare That Works For All

paul_barber_may2019Paul Barber

Policy Advisor | New Zealand Council of Christian Social Services

We have reached a turning point for social welfare in this country with the release of the Welfare Expert Advisory Group (WEAG) report Whakamana Tāngata: Restoring Dignity to Social Security in New Zealand.

The report sets out what we must do to rebalance our social welfare system in a way that ensures the dignity and mana for all. The coming months are crucial as the Government makes decisions about adopting the 42 recommendations.  Read more »

Te Rautaki mō Whanaungatanga

katie-bruceDr Katie Bruce

Chief Executive | Volunteering New Zealand

The last few weeks have demonstrated the power of volunteering and the need to connect through our differences.

Volunteering brings communities together, allowing people to work with and across our differences. Volunteering is time you spend for the benefit of the community without expectation of payment. It is a language of care and aroha. The meaning of volunteering, mahi aroha and social action differs. For Māori (mahi aroha) and Pacific peoples, for example, it is deeply rooted in culture. Read more »

The Community Sector – a Worker’s Paradise?

Brenda photoBrenda Pilott

National Manager | Social Service Providers Aotearoa

The community sector ought to be the best place to work, with a genuine alignment of purpose between employers and employees, underpinned by shared commitments to justice, fairness and respect.  Our NGOs ought to be model employers.

But we’re a long way from the community sector being a paradise for workers.  Or even providing decent work environments, in many cases.  Why is that? Read more »

The Importance of Culture, Identity and Social Connectedness to Children and Young People’s Mental Health and Wellbeing

tayo-agunlejikaTayo Agunlejika

Executive Director | Multicultural NZ

The Treaty of Waitangi, as a founding document of Aotearoa New Zealand, provides a framework to strive for racial equity, partnership, kindness and fairness. We have made major gains in getting along with each other compared to other OECD, Commonwealth and francophone countries. Notwithstanding, we still have a long way to go in achieving racial justice especially now that we are witnessing foreign cultures and foreign toxic race politics infiltrating our polity, institutions and community – our kiwi culture of respect, DIY and fairness. Read more »

Student Volunteer Week 2019 celebrates youth leadership and Kaitiakitanga

katie-bruceKatie Bruce

Chief Executive | Volunteering New Zealand

Young people are stepping up and taking on some of the most important issues our world has ever seen. From those who spend their weekends protecting native birds from predators, to the students responding with acts of kindness in the wake of the horrific terrorist attacks in Christchurch, the contributions of young people in Aotearoa New Zealand should not be underestimated. Read more »

Reaching out to each other

coalition-photo-13-feb-2019Louise Rees

National Social Connection Adviser | Age Concern New Zealand

On Friday afternoon, one week after the terrorist attack in Christchurch, I went to the Kilbirnie mosque in Wellington to be with others during the two-minute silence. As we waited, there were quiet conversations as people shared their reactions to the attack. A prevalent theme was that racism does exist in New Zealand, and that we need to recognize and challenge it, in ourselves and in others. Read more »

FRIDAY

tess-2-copyTess Casey

Chief Executive | Neighbourhood Support New Zealand

I sat down to write this blog on the afternoon of Friday 15 March.  It was supposed to be about Neighbours’ Day Aotearoa.  I think it still is.

It is hard to digest what has happened.  The terror attack in Christchurch was targeted at our Muslim community, and the people who bore the brunt of it were the innocent people in the mosques at the time and their families who are now dealing with grief, uncertainty and loss.  They are the people who first and foremost need our love, support and protection. The wider Muslim community is also grieving and feeling vulnerable and unsafe. Read more »

Surprising discoveries and critical friends at a Parliament Breakfast

rodbaxterRod Baxter

Director of Impact | Prince’s Trust New Zealand

When I first received the invite for this event, I had this preconceived vision of a fancy lavish breakfast with mountains of gourmet cuisine. I couldn’t have been more wrong. Instead, the breakfast was described as “light”, which is evidently a euphemism for “insufficient”. It’s actually all my fault however, as I was too busy talking to interesting people and missed the vegetarian option. I enjoyed three slices of fruit.

It turns out I was never there for the kai; something more powerful was happening. Read more »

Youth sector following young people’s lead

kirsten-harivelKirsten Le Harivel

Digital Strategy Manager | Ara Taiohi

Young people and technology feel intertwined in our modern world. Yet we, the people working with young people, aren’t always taking up technological advances at the same rate as the young people we are working with. Read more »

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