United Nations Declare Day to Celebrate Autism

Press Release – Autism NZ

Monday 2 April, has been designated World Autism Awareness Day by the United Nations general Assembly. Autism New Zealand is hoping that all New Zealanders will try to better understand this often confusing condition.

United Nations Declare Day to Celebrate Autism

Monday 2 April, has been designated World Autism Awareness Day by the United Nations general Assembly. Autism New Zealand is hoping that all New Zealanders will try to better understand this often confusing condition.

Community activities are planned across the country to raise awareness and schools and businesses are planning to hold special mufti days on Monday 2 April to help raise the profile of autism in New Zealand.

“Despite the media attention over the last year or so many people know very little about the disorder and its effect on families”, says Autism NZ Chief Executive Alison Molloy.

This year Ban Ki-Moon, The Secretary General of the United Nations delivered a message to the world saying:
“Reaching out to people with autism spectrum disorders requires a global political commitment and better international cooperation, especially in sharing good practices. Greater investments in the social, education and labour sectors are crucially important, since developed and developing countries alike still need to improve their capacities to address the unique needs of people with autism and cultivate their talents. We also need to promote further research, train non-specialised care providers, and enable the autism community to more easily navigate care systems to obtain services that can support and mainstream individuals with autism.

The annual observance of World Autism Awareness Day is meant to spur such action and draw attention to the unacceptable discrimination, abuse and isolation experienced by people with autism and their loved ones. As highlighted by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, people with autism are equal citizens who should all enjoy human rights and fundamental freedoms.”

“A world without Autism would be a lesser world and many people on the spectrum and their families have their own powerful story here in New Zealand” says Ms Molloy. “One such story has recently been published by Louise Inglis “Happiness in his eyes: A story of love and disability” and we encourage the public to read, watch, learn and value the difference that people with Autism and Asperger’s bring to our lives”

For further information and support to find out the details of your local branch, contact Autism New Zealand Inc

Phone 0800 AUTISM (0800 288 476) or visit www.autismnz.org.nz

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Content Sourced from scoop.co.nz
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