More Synthetic Cannabinoids Being Banned

Press Release – New Zealand Government

Friday, 30 March 2012 Media Release More Synthetic Cannabinoids Being Banned A further three synthetic cannabis substances found in products sold in some dairies are in the process of being banned and are expected to be off the shelves by the end of …
Hon Peter Dunne
Associate Minister of Health

Friday, 30 March 2012 Media Release

More Synthetic Cannabinoids Being Banned

A further three synthetic cannabis substances found in products sold in some dairies are in the process of being banned and are expected to be off the shelves by the end of next week, Associate Minister of Health Peter Dunne announced today.

This will soon bring to 24 the number of substances banned under Temporary Class Drug Notices, Mr Dunne said. The provisions in the Misuse of Drugs Act to issue such notices became law in August 2011.

The latest substances have been identified as the chemicals AM-1248, AM-2232 and UR-144.

“I am informed by the Ministry of Health that these substances are understood to have been found in products called Spice Gold, Spice Diamond and Tai High,” said Mr Dunne.

Mr Dunne says today’s announcement means that any products containing these substances must be removed from retail shelves and should no longer be sold over the internet in New Zealand.

The Temporary Class Drug Notice will come into force on 6 April.

Temporary Class Drug Notices are a holding measure until permanent legislation can be developed this year to reverse the onus of proof so all such products must meet appropriate levels of safety before they can be approved and sold.

A total of 23 synthetic cannabis substances will be subject to temporary bans once the latest notice comes into force. In addition, Mr Dunne recently announced a temporary ban on the stimulant substance DMAA (1,3-dimethylamylamine), which will come into force on 9 April. DMAA is the first substance other than synthetic cannabis substances to be banned using the temporary notices.

The notices are issued on substances rather than commercial products, meaning that the products that contain those substances effectively become banned.

ENDS

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