Its lights, camera, action for NorthTech

Press Release – NorthTec

Its lights, camera, action for NorthTec’s new video and electronic media diploma A new diploma in Video and Electronic Media (Level 6) is, now being offered by NorthTec that will enable students to gain valuable work experience and a head start in finding …Its lights, camera, action for NorthTec’s new video and electronic media diploma

A new diploma in Video and Electronic Media (Level 6) is, now being offered by NorthTec that will enable students to gain valuable work experience and a head start in finding employment by learning from industry savvy tutors.

Based on an Eastern Institute of Technology curriculum model that has been successfully in the Hawke’s Bay, the aim of the diploma is to have graduates who can work competently in a range of disciplines aligned with the video/audio and multi-media production industry both in New Zealand and internationally.

“With this course we want to be able to create pathways into the industry, enabling our students to discover potential areas of employment they perhaps might not have considered or even knew existed,” said co-tutor Karen Sidney.

The other half of the tutoring team, Dennis Murphy, said the beauty of the diploma is that those that enrol on it will get to experience all the aspects of film making from audio acquisition, camera work, editing, lighting, concept development, set design and script writing, and might find a specific area that they want to concentrate on and develop.

Completing the Diploma in Video and Electronic Media (Level 6) at NorthTec opens up a host of good career options including as camera operators, script writers, sound and/or lighting engineers, video producers and gaffers or grips.

Not only will the new diploma equip students with the ability to make oral and written presentations to clients and brief video and film crews properly, but it will include information on the history of the film and TV industry, its legal framework, funding organisations and the industry structure. However, Karen believes that the big bonus of being part of the course will be the practical application students get with material being prepared for both the New Zealand and International markets across video, film and Internet platforms. Over the course of the two years, students produce a short film, a mock TV commercial, a documentary, a music video and a corporate-oriented video.

In time, Karen said the focus of the diploma will be adapted to service the specific needs of the region that might see other community groups such as the Northland Youth Theatre and individual actors involved to assist students with their projects.

The back half of the performing arts building at Raumanga campus in Whangarei, affectionately known as The Barn, will be used for the pre-production and production phases of the various projects using new camera, sound and editing equipment.

“It is similar to how a normal film studio would be with the fittings and lights all there and working ready for the first intake of students to make full use of,” Karen said.

There is also a separate area in the vicinity of the new Arts Centre at the campus for postproduction and editing.

Karen has many years of experience in the New Zealand Film and TV industry and helped work on indigenous films Ngati and Mauri in the early 1980s, while for the past five years, Dennis has been self-employed in Northland producing videos for a wide clientele.

Although the two tutors have different experiences in the industry, they feel this will complement what is taught, and what students come to know on the course.

Content Sourced from scoop.co.nz
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