Cancer education and support a first in Aotearoa

Press Release – Cancer Society

Kia ora – E te iwi, a cancer education and support programme for Maori, has been gifted to the Maori health community by the Cancer Society. The programme is the result of the Society working collaboratively with Iwi and Maori health providers …Media Release
13 February 2012
A first in Aotearoa, New Zealand

Kia ora – E te iwi, a cancer education and support programme for Maori, has been gifted to the Maori health community by the Cancer Society. The programme is the result of the Society working collaboratively with Iwi and Maori health providers to develop a Kaupapa Maori cancer education programme to be delivered for Maori by Maori.

Kia ora – E te iwi is for anyone who has had to cope with cancer, either as a patient, support person or health professional. It aims to increase knowledge of cancer and its treatments, encourage discussion on common concerns and coping mechanisms, and encourage participants to learn from each other. Up to 20 people can attend the programme, which is delivered by two trained facilitators. The topics covered include:
What is cancer?
Managing the effects of cancer
Personal reactions to cancer
Communication
Where to from here?

The Cancer Society worked alongside four Maori health providers, based in Wellington, Palmerston North, New Plymouth and Whangarei to develop and pilot Kia ora – E te iwi. The success of the pilot means 12 Maori health providers will send facilitators to Kokiri Marae, Wellington for free training. Twenty-two facilitators will be trained by Hazel Neser, National Coordinator of the Living Well Programme, Cancer Society and Pauline Wharerau, Kia ora – E te iwi advisor, Best Care (Whakapai Hauora) Charitable Trust, Palmerston North. Providers who have trained facilitators are eligible to apply to the Cancer Society for funding to run Kia ora – E te iwi during 2012.

A DVD using a Tikanga Maori framework complements the delivery of the programme, providing perspectives from Maori who are survivors, caregivers, whanau supporters and health professionals.
ENDS

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