Research Grant Awarded

Press Release – Friends of Turnball Library

Wellington researcher Charlotte Williams has been awarded the 2012 Friends of the Turnbull Library Research Grant of $10,000 to assist in completing her current project, A History of Relations between Māori and the National Party 1936-1996.Media release on behalf of the Friends of the Turnbull Library

10 December 2011
Research Grant Awarded

Wellington researcher Charlotte Williams has been awarded the 2012 Friends of the Turnbull Library Research Grant of $10,000 to assist in completing her current project, A History of Relations between Māori and the National Party 1936-1996.

“We are extremely pleased to contribute to this major aspect of New Zealand’s political history which will be of considerable public interest,” said Rachel Underwood, President of the Friends of the Turnbull Library. “Charlotte will have access to some wonderful material in the rich and diverse collections of the Alexander Turnbull Library.

The Friends of the Turnbull Library Research Grant is intended to emphasise the distinctive contribution that a research and heritage library makes to public knowledge. It celebrates the significant role of ongoing research and publication based on the Alexander Turnbull Library collections and the knowledge of the staff. It is funded from income derived from two generous bequests, by David Bilbrough and Wesley (Bill) Secker.

Charlotte Williams is an independent researcher and public policy analyst with degrees from Oxford University and Princeton. A former member of the Council of Lincoln University (1987-205), she is the eighth recipient of the FoTL Research Grant.

Previous grants have been awarded to Philip Norman for his biography of Douglas Lilburn; Tim Beaglehole for a biography of the historian JC Beaglehole; Alex Bremner to complete a study of colonial Anglican architecture; Paul Diamond for his photo-biography of Makareti (Maggie Papakura); Jennifer Shennan for her biography of dancer Poul Gnatt; Paul Meredith for a book based on the journey to England of the Māori King Te Rata in 1914; and to Philip Simpson for his book, Totara: Te Mahi a Rauru.

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