University of Auckland Mathematician honoured

Press Release – University of Auckland

Professor Rod Gover from the Department of Mathematics at The University of Auckland has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand. “Rod is internationally renowned for his work in differential geometry, and is one of the jewels in the crown …3 November 2011

Mathematician honoured

Professor Rod Gover from the Department of Mathematics at The University of Auckland has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

“Rod is internationally renowned for his work in differential geometry, and is one of the jewels in the crown of The University of Auckland. It’s an honour and a pleasure to have him as our colleague,” says Head of Department of Mathematics Professor James Sneyd.

“Being elected as a Fellow is an honour given to our top researchers for showing distinction in research or in the advancement of science, technology or the humanities,” said Dr Stephen Goldson, chair of the Society’s Academy, in announcing the news.

Professor Gover is an internationally recognised expert in geometry and its applications to analysis, differential equations and theoretical physics. His research not only tackles fascinating mathematical problems but is of direct relevance to other fields of science. For instance conformal geometry, one of the geometries that he studies, can be used to explain how light behaves as it travels through space, how cells organise themselves into tissues, and the properties of materials used in construction.

Many people use these geometries to some degree in their work, and Professor Gover says that he enjoys the exposure to a wide variety of fields that this affords him. For instance, he is currently collaborating with a physicist who studies the fundamental physics of the universe, looking at questions which arise in string theory and quantum gravity.

The Royal Society of New Zealand now has 376 Fellows. Fellows are involved in providing expert advice, promoting best research practice and disseminating science and humanities information.

ENDS

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