Police Association launches 2011 law and order policies

Press Release – Police Association

The Police Association today released its 2011 policy document, Towards a Safer New Zealand, at a launch function hosted by the Minister of Police at Parliament. “The need for NZ to be seen as the safest place to visit, do business in, and live has …18 October 2011

Police Association launches 2011 law and order policies

The Police Association today released its 2011 policy document, Towards a Safer New Zealand, at a launch function hosted by the Minister of Police at Parliament.

“The need for NZ to be seen as the safest place to visit, do business in, and live has never been more obvious than during the Rugby World Cup, which climaxes this weekend,” Police Association President Greg O’Connor said.

“Over the past weeks New Zealand has put on a magnificent display not only of rugby, but also of hospitality. For tourists, feeling safe as they enjoy themselves is a huge part of that. As our guests head home we want them telling their friends and families about a clean, green, and safe country.

“In these hard economic times, we need the world more than they need us. Being safe and corruption-free can be a major point of difference. Policing is the thermometer of these factors. Efficient, effective and non-corrupt police give confidence that the rest of the country is the same,” Mr O’Connor said.

Mr O’Connor said Towards a Safer New Zealand represents the ideas of rank and file New Zealand Police about how we achieve that.

Mr O’Connor drew particular attention to looming decisions on allocation of the 700 MHz radio spectrum, freed up by the digital TV switchover, where it is vital Police and emergency services are allocated space.

“This strategically vital but also commercially highly valuable spectrum is critical to public safety mobile broadband going forward. Decisions made now will have ramifications for decades to come,” Mr O’Connor said.

“Also of major importance is that we maintain and continue to build police numbers – especially numbers of generalist constables. Those are the staff that give us the flexibility to deploy large numbers at short notice, for example after the Canterbury earthquakes or to police the Rugby World Cup finals,” Mr O’Connor explained.

“We have seen considerable investment in Police in recent years, and are now starting to see the benefits in falling crime. But New Zealand is still under-policed by world standards, and the recent gains are fragile. We need to keep up the momentum if we are to retain an international reputation as the best country in the world in which to live, work, invest and of course, play.”

ENDS

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