Govt over-rides Chch airport to free up Kaiapoi sections

Article – BusinessDesk

Oct. 6 (BusinessDesk) – Long-standing objections from Christchurch International Airport have been over-ridden to allow development of approximately 1,000 new sections for Kaiapoi red-zone residents who must move but want to stay in the area.

Govt over-rides Chch airport to free up Kaiapoi sections

Oct. 6 (BusinessDesk) – Long-standing objections from Christchurch International Airport have been over-ridden to allow development of approximately 1,000 new sections for Kaiapoi red-zone residents who must move but want to stay in the area.

Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee announced the government would allow construction to occur in an area where the airport has traditionally objected to developments which could affect its flight paths.

The move responds to protests from residents of Kaiapoi who are unable to rebuild on earthquake-damaged land, but who want to remain in the area.

The trade-off is that they may experience greater aircraft noise when the flight path is in use.

At present, there is a so-called 50 decibel “noise contour” in place that allows planes to operate.

“Overall it’s a positive outcome because it provides for the safe and efficient operation of the airport with a 50 decibels air noise contour, but provides an exemption within that zone for residential development in Kaiapoi,” said Brownlee, who invoked special powers under emergency legislation to deal with special earthquake issues.

“By changing the current Regional Policy Statement up to another 300 residential sections could be opened up for development in south-west Kaiapoi and as many as three times that number in the north-east.”

The change takes effect from Saturday this week.

The airport and local authorities had been consulted on the initiative.

“We’ve made this one-off exemption to the noise contour because of the extenuating circumstances in Kaiapoi, which suffered severe damage in the earthquakes. It’s unlikely any further exemption under the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Act will be on the cards,” Brownlee said.

(BusinessDesk)

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